Endocrine Abstracts (2006) 11 P329

Association of c-reactive protein with insulin resistance in first degree relatives of diabetic patients

NE Gulcelik, R Serter, M Ozkaya & Y Aral


SB Ankara Hastanesi, Ankara, Turkey.


Objective: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a nontraditional risk factor that predicts cardiovascular disease but its relationship between diabetes and insulin resistance is not well documented. We evaluated the association of CRP levels and insulin resistance in a group of patients at high risk for diabetes.

Materials and methods: In this study we evaluated 22 first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients with impaired glucose tolerance test (Group 1) and 24 first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients with normal glucose tolerance test (Group 2) and 22 control subjects (Group 3) matched for age, sex and BMI. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical analyses and insulin and CRP levels were performed in each subject. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA).

Results: CRP levels were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 and Group 3 (4.12±1.7 vs 3.7±2.1 mg/l, P<0.05 and 4.12±1.7 vs 2.1±0.8 mg/l, P<0.05, respectively), and also in Group 2 compared with Group 3 (3.7±2.1 vs 2.1±0.8 mg/l, P<0, 05). HOMA levels were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (3.2±1.7 vs 2.4±0.9 mg/l, P<0.05 and 3.2±1.7 vs 1.1±0.4 mg/l, P<0.05, respectively) and Group 3, and also in Group 2 compared with Group 3 (2.4±0.9 mg/l vs 1.1±0.4 mg/l, P<0.05).CRP levels were correlated with HOMA (r=0.326, P<0.05) in the whole group of patients. CRP was found to be related to HOMA independently of fat mass (r2=+0.22, P<0.05).

Conclusion: These findings support that subclinical inflammation is associated with insulin resistance. CRP can provide additional prognostic information in first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients.

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