Endocrine Abstracts (2017) 49 EP252 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.49.EP252

The volume of parathyroid adenoma is related to presurgical PTH and 25OH-D3, but not calcium levels at patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

Cristian Velicescu1, Cristina Gatu1, Alexandru Grigorovici1, Radu Danila1, Valentin Munteanu2, Voichita Mogos1, Carmen Vulpoi1, Cristina Preda1, Simona Mogos1 & Dumitru D Branisteanu1


1University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Gr.T.Popa’, Iasi, Romania; 2University of Medicine and Pharmacy ‘Iuliu Hatieganu’, Cluj, Romania.


Aims: We wanted to evaluate the correlations between the volume of the surgically removed parathyroid adenoma and the presurgical metabolic profile of patients diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism.

Materials and methods: Prospective multicentric study, enrolling 52 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism from two medical units, proposed for surgery. Serum calcium and PTH were evaluated in all patients before surgery, and 25OH-D3 was measured only in the 33 patients recruited from one of the two surgery departments. Parathyroid volume was measured immediately after excision, using the formula of a rotating ellypsoid. Data were statistically evaluated by using Pearson correlation analysis. Correlations were considered significant at P values lower than 0.05.

Results: We observed a significant correlation between the volume of parathyroid adenomas and presurgical PTH (P<0.001) but not presurgical calcium levels at patients from the two medical units and in the whole group. Twenty-nine out of the 33 patients diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism recruited from the first medical unit had 25OH-D3 levels in the range of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. 25OH-D3 was not significantly correlated with PTH or calcium levels, but a significant negative correlation was found between the volume of the parathyroid adenoma and serum 25OH-D3 levels (P<0.05).

Conclusion: The volume of parathyroid adenoma seems to be related to presurgical PTH and 25OH-D3, but not calcium level. D hypovitaminosis is frequently found at patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and may contribute to particular disease profiles. Higher PTH and lower 25OH-D3 levels, as well as larger adenomas may be accompanied by increased disease severity, or by a different spectrum of disease complications.