Endocrine Abstracts (2011) 26 P572

Phosphate levels inversely correlate with aortic stiffness in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

Fanni Athanasouli1, Leonidas Papadopoulos2, Anastasia Vemmou2, Konstantine Chalaris2, Evelin Efthimiou2, Theodore Athanasoulis3, Christos Papamichael2, Kimon Stamatelopulos2, Evangelos Terpos1 & Maria Alevizaki1


1Endocrine Unit, Department of Clinical Therapeutics, Alexandra Hospital, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece; 2Vascular Laboratory, Department of Clinical Therapeutics, Alexandra Hospital, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece; 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alexandra Hospital, Athens, Greece.


Introduction: Although data on the association of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) with cardiovascular disease are accumulating, there is still controversy on this issue. Moreover, possible associations of aortic stiffness and central aortic pressures with pHPT and associated effective molecules have not been addressed.

Methods: Seventy patients with pHPT were consecutively recruited from the outpatients’ clinic of an academic department of endocrinology. In all patients, arterial stiffness was assessed by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) between carotid and femoral arteries while reflected waves and central blood pressures were evaluated by pulse wave analysis. Laboratory evaluation included parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25(OH)vitD, total calcium, phosphate and albumin levels.

Results: Phosphate levels but not calcium, PTH or vitamin D3 levels inversely correlated with PWV (−0.244, P=0.046) but not with reflected waves or central blood pressures. By multivariate analysis, among other risk factors, phosphate levels independently determined PWV (P=0.032).

Conclusions: In patients with pHPT, phosphate levels independently correlated with aortic stiffness as expressed by PWV. Further research is needed to assess the possible effect of low phosphate levels on atherosclerosis in pHPT.