ISSN 1470-3947 (print) | ISSN 1479-6848 (online)

Endocrine Abstracts (2015) 37 EP443 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.37.EP443

Impact on quality of life in peoples with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Chong Hwa Kim1, Su Jin Jeong1, Ji Oh Mok2, Ki Young Lee3 & Sung Rae Kim4


1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Sejong General Hospital, Bucheon, Republic of Korea; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Republic of Korea; 3Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Gacheon University Gil Hospital, Incheon, Republic of Korea; 4Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Bucheon St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Republic of Korea.


Objective: This study was performed to determine the impact on quality of life and sleep impairment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN).

Research design and method: The study pool consisted of 200 randomly selected peoples with type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PDPN was diagnosed using visual analogue scales (VAS) and medical history. The patients were asked to answer the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), Medical Outcomes Study Sleep (MOS-Sleep) Scale, EuroQol (EQ-5D), and VAS and estimate the quality of life in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Results: Among the patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (n=200), 82 (41%) were diagnosed with PDPN. PDPN was independently associated with age, fasting plasma glucose, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and previous cerebrovascular events. All pain severity and interference measures were higher in patients with PDPN than those in patients with painless DPN and patients with PDPN reported more impaired sleep and lower EQ-5D and VAS scores. 200 patients had DPN and Pain Severity Index and pain interference items such as general activity, mood, walking, normal work, relationship, sleep, and enjoyment of life in BPI–DPN were higher in patients with painful DPN compared to those in patients with painless DPN. MOS 6 items-sleep adequacy, respiratory problem during sleep, sleep initiation problem, sleep maintenance problem, and somnolence-sleep scale were lower in patient with painful DPN than painless DPN. EQ-5D index were lower in patients with painful DPN compared to those in patients with painless DPN.

Conclusions: Patients with painful DPN have greater discomfort during daily activities and sleep, and reduced QoL compared to patients with painless DPN. This study provides on the extent of the impact of pain on QoL in patients with painful DPN and physicians should carefully consider pain symptoms in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

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