Endocrine Abstracts (2017) 49 EP577 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.49.EP577

Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients - analysis of 958305 hospitalizations

Magdalena Walicka1, Monika Puzianowska-Kuznicka2,3, Marcin Chlebus4, Andrzej Sliwczynski5, Melania Brzozowska5, Daniel Rutjowski5, Lidia Kania1,2, Marcin Czech6, Andrzej Jacyna5 & Edward Franek1,2


1Department of Internal Diseases, Endocrinology and Diabetology, Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of the Interior and Administration, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Human Epigenetics, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Quantitative Finance, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 5National Health Found, Warsaw, Poland; 6Warsaw University of Technology, Business School, Warsaw, Poland.


Background: Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong chronic disease with higher risk of mortality and morbidity

Objective: To study the risk factors of death in hospitalized diabetic patients

Methods: Data obtained from the database of the National Health Fund (NHF), a public organization financing medical procedures in Poland regarded 958305 hospitalizations of adult (≥18 years old) patients with diabetes in 2014 year. Logistic regression models were performed to identity independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.

Results: There were 573719 hospitalizations in non-surgical wards and 384586 in surgical wards. The mean in-hospital mortality rate was 3,20% (4,52% in non-surgical and 1,23% in surgical wards). In non-surgical wards, odds ratio for in-hospital death increased with patients age, being 52-fold higher in the ≥95 years old group compared to the 18–24 years age group; male gender, emergency admission, admission on weekend or other non-working day, hospitalization in county/town, private or regional hospital (vs teaching hospital), were factors associated with greater mortality. In surgical wards odds ratio for in-hospital death started to increase after 75th year of life, being 13-fold higher in the ≥95 years old group compared to the 18–24 years age group; female gender, emergency admission, admission on weekend or other non-working day, hospitalization in county/town or regional hospital (vs teaching hospital), were factors associated with greater mortality.

Conclusions: Predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with diabetes are age, sex, type of hospital admission, admission on non-working day and type of hospital.