ISSN 1470-3947 (print) | ISSN 1479-6848 (online)

Endocrine Abstracts (2017) 52 P12 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.52.P12

1-Year survival rates for neuroendocrine tumour patients in England

Tracey Genus1,2, Catherine Bouvier1, Kwok Wong2, Rajaventhan Srirajaskanthan3, Brian Rous4,5, Denis Talbot6,7, Juan Valle8,9, Mohid Khan10, Neil Pearce11, Mona Elshafie12, Nicholas Reed13, Tu Vinh Luong14, Alia Munir15 & John Ramage3


1NET Patient Foundation, Leamington Spa, UK; 2National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service Public Health England, Birmingham, UK; 3Kings College Hospital, London, UK; 4Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK; 5National Cancer Registration Service, Cambridge, UK; 6University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 7Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK; 8University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 9The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; 10University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK; 11University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK; 12University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; 13Beatson Oncology Centre, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 14Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 15Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK.


Introduction: Accurate survival data for patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) across the UK has been difficult to capture. Individual centres often report good survival rates, however, national data has not previously been available.

Materials and methods: NET patient survival was calculated for England using the Public Health England (PHE) National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) dataset which captures tumour stage using TNM staging. Grade was based on dysplasia and morphology. The Kaplan-Meier survival method was used to analyse overall death in 12,755 patients diagnosed with a NET between 2013 and 2015.

Results: The 1-year overall survival was 75% for NETs (95% CI, 74.5–76.1), 72% in males vs 79% in females (P < .001). Survival by age group was as follows: 0–55 years 90% (95% CI, 89.2–91.2); 56–65 80% (95% CI, 78.3–81.4); 66–75 71% (95% CI, 70.0–72.9); >75 60% (95% CI, 57.9–61.5) (with P < .001 for comparisons between all age groups). Survival decreased with increasing grade (1/2 and 3) and stage (1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively):

Colorectal (n=2712):: Grade 1/2 (excluding Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC)): 99% (97.6–99.4); 97% (93.9–98.3); 99% (95.4–99.7); 80% (72.9–86.2)

Grade 3 (excluding MANEC): 89% (70.4–96.4); 90% (72.9–96.8); 67% (56.3–76.2); 22% (16.3–27.9)

MANEC: 98% (85.8–99.7); 97% (92.3–99.2); 85% (74.4–91.8); 60% (45.2–72.6)

Overall (including unknown stage): 88% (86.5–88.9)

Lung (n=2,460, excluding *small and large cell lung cancer):

Grade 1/2: 98% (97.2–99.1); 98% (93.7–99.6); 93% (82.9–97.4); 69% (59.1–76.8)

Grade 3: 93% (89.4–95.6); 81% (71.4–88.2); 63% (55.0–70.7); 26% (22.5–30.0)

Overall: 74% (72.7–76.2) in comparison, *SCLC (n=97,239) 42% (42.2–42.8)

Pancreas (n=1,207):

Grade 1/2: 97% (92.7–98.7); 95% (88.8–97.6); NK; 85% (79.7–89.6)

Grade 3: 87% (68.3–94.8); 87% (58.6–96.7); 56% (30.5–74.7); 42% (35.9–48.9)

Overall: 81% (78.3–82.8)

Small bowel (n=1,688):

Grade 1/2: 98% (90.8–99.4); 96% (89.7–98.5); 96% (93.6–97.3); 88% (84.3–90.7)

Grade 3: NK; NK; 83% (60.1–93.1); 72% (60.5–80.5)

Overall: 90% (88.6–91.5)

Conclusion: The survival results show that tumour grade has the potential to be a good prognostic indicator for all types of NET. This is the first large series regarding MANEC demonstrating poor outcomes.

Keywords: Neuroendocrine cancer; survival; grade; stage; age